Welcome Back!

This week, I wanted to share with you a brew with which I have been practicing for some time now. It is a tribal aggro deck that is capable of amazingly aggressive starts coupled with plenty of disruption to keep the opponent on their toes. However, this tribal crew doesn’t get nearly as many hugs as the Elves or Goblins do… But then again, the Rogues could care less! That’s right, this week’s deck is tribal Rogue aggro. It is amazing at dumping a bunch of annoying evasive weenies that swarm the field while playing lords like Oona’s Blackguard that turn the dorks into pseudo-Abyssal Specters. Before I go any further, let me show you a couple of lists:

Legacy Rogues Version 1 - Budget

Rogues (26)
Frogtosser Banneret
Inkfathom Infiltrator
Nightshade Stinger
Oona’s Blackguard
Oona’s Prowler
Prickly Boggart
Stinkdrinker Bandit

Spells (12)
Go for the Throat
Inquisition of Kozilek
Spell Pierce
Snuff Out
Smother
Lands (22)
Darkslick Shores
Island
10 Swamp
Underground River

Sideboard (15)
Duress
Mana Leak
Cold-Eyed Selkie
Earwig Squad
Go for the Throat
Faerie Macabre

Legacy Rogues Version 2 - Monetized

Rogues (23)
Nightshade Stinger
Oona’s Blackguard
Oona’s Prowler
Prickly Boggart
Stinkdrinker Bandit
True-Name Nemesis

Spells (15)
Bitterblossom
Flusterstorm
Smother
Inquisition of Kozilek
Snuff Out
Thoughtseize
Lands (22)
Underground Sea
Island
Swamp
Polluted Delta
Mutavault

Sideboard (15)
Duress
Mana Leak
Cold-Eyed Selkie
Faerie Macabre
Spell Pierce
Flusterstorm

The Basics

In general, the rogues operate like any other tribal decks. Play the dudes, play some lords, employ some signature, tribe-dependent form of interaction, then win. Both of the lords for the rogues are only cmc 2, which means that the beats come very quickly with a bunch of cheap evasive rogues. Frogtosser Banneret is truly amazing when he hits play; the ability to play multiple creatures per turn sans AEther Vial and maintain a 22-land curve is quite impressive. He also makes it easier to leave up removal and counterspell mana.

Oona’s Prowler is the best beater in the deck. It will often deny the opponent any form of card advantage, and it goes quite nicely with Oona’s Blackguard to quickly strip the opponent of cards or risk dying at a ridiculous pace. Stinkdrinker Bandit is the other lord. Technically, he is not cmc 2, but prowling him into play is incredibly easy. Any turn 1 creature will be evasive, and will almost certainly allow for a turn 2 prowl of this monster. The gain of +2/+1 if a rogue is unblocked is overpowered in a deck where almost every creature is evasive in some way. Don’t leave home without these two!

Prickly Boggart, Nightshade Stinger, and Inkfathom Infiltrator are the only rogues not mentioned above. They are the creatures that end up poking the opponent to death. All three are simply efficient evasive creatures that couple well with lords to provide the damage push that tribal decks need. For the monetized version, more efficient rogues are used. For example, the ineffable True-Name Nemesis usurps Inkfathom Infiltrator, and the Banneret bites the dust in favor of Bitterblossom. The powerful enchantment makes Rogues that fly for a mere 1 life per turn. See the section on differences between the two decks below for more information.

Other than these, the primary difference between rogues and other tribal decks is the amount of usable disruption available. Goblins, Elves, and Humans have basically no serious disruption that they can use due to color differences and a total devotion to the creature plan. Merfolk have countermagic, being mono-blue, but the amazing Rogues can abuse all kinds of lovely disruption spells. I prefer a decent mix of countermagic, discard, and creature removal. Snuff Out will catch many opponents by surprise, and can swing games in your favor when played correctly. Spell Pierce is easy to hold up mana for, and Smother will deal with almost anything threatening or just annoying. Inquisiton of Kozilek is a great discard spell that is fairly easy to get online.

Differences Between the Standard Version and the Monetized One

The monetized version of the deck employs other creatures and disruption cards that are potentially more powerful. However, the basic premise of the deck is the same. Money cards like fetches, duals, True-Name Nemesis, etc. definitely add something that gives the deck an edge. Does the monetized version win more? Absolutely. Is the win percentage much greater? No. I would not consider the monetized version “better;” it simply has more money cards that add an edge to the deck that cannot be had with cheaper cards. Even so, the “Budget” rogues deck is fun and powerful that will pick up many wins. Try it out and have fun!

That’s all for this week. I hope you have fun beating opponents over the head with the rogues! Too bad Noggin Whack isn’t more playable or else this would be its deck…

See you next time!

/Peyton

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