How To Survive In Post-Cruise Modern

Hi all,

Since the banning of [c]Treasure Cruise[/c], everyone has dropped Delver. Unfortunately, no other deck must have been able to grind out the first few turns of the game and replenish its gas in a similar way.

Affinity, Infect, Amulet, Storm, and Burn are tearing up the format.

become immense

Affinity has the most consistent turn 4 wins of any aggressive deck out there. Its creatures are difficult to block. Removal spells are often pointless; the 1/1 creature you targeted simply becomes a +1/+1 counter on another creature.

Infect just picked up [c]Become Immense[/c]. With [c]Noble Hierarch[/c] and [c]Spellskite[/c], the deck can prevent all successful interaction and easily earn a win by turn 3. Any attempts to nickel and dime the Infect player only fuel the immensity that it can become.

Amulet has always been a problem. It seems that online players have known this better than paper players because until Justin Cohen tore through Fate Reforged, not many people were talking about it. On the first turn, [c]Amulet of Vigor[/c] can win or set up the turn 2 win. You attempt to board in [c]Primeval Titan[/c] hate, and then you become assimilated into the Borg and unwisely cast [c]Summoner’s Pact[/c] in spite of not being able to pay for it thanks to [c]Hive Mind[/c].

Similarly, Storm wins on turn 3. You bring in graveyard hate and enchantment hate in game 2 only to lose to a [c]Goblin Electromancer[/c]-fueled chain of spells. Do you have 1-for-1 creature removal to handle Electromancer? The storm player will simply play a couple [c]Pyretic Ritual[/c] into [c]Empty the Warrens[/c] and easily crush you with six 1/1s.

Burn. You may not realize that you’re losing on turn 2 because you have 15 life, and your opponent only has [c]Monastery Swiftspear[/c] and [c]Eidolon of the Great Revel[/c], but when you have to cast two spells to have a chance, and your opponent is holding 9 points of burn in their hand, they know well that they have won. Thanks to [c]Skullcrack[/c], even [c]Kor Firewalker[/c] can’t keep a [c]Monastery Swiftspear[/c] at bay. He just becomes a “gain 1 life, prevent combat damage from one creature for one turn” spell that costs you a ton of life to cast thanks to fetchlands and shocklands.

What can men do against such reckless hate?

skullcrack

Each of these decks succeed in the face of “the turn 4 rule” that has led to the banning of [c]Seething Song[/c], [c]Rite of Flame[/c], [c]Hypergenesis[/c], [c]Dark Depths[/c], [c]Blazing Shoal[/c], Artifact Lands, [c]Glimpse of Nature[/c], and maybe [c]Second Sunrise[/c] and [c]Dread Return[/c].

I suspect the last two are arguable.

Still, a good 14 cards on the Modern banned list for this reason, composing almost half the list.

So what do we do in light of this infraction of a fundamental rule of Modern?

amulet-of-vigor

Well, on his Twitter, Tom Martell suggests a sweeping ban of the worst offenders: [c]Amulet of Vigor[/c], [c]Manamorphose[/c], [c]Glistener Elf[/c], [c]Griselbrand[/c], and [c]Tarmogoyf[/c]. That’s a solid list, although I think [c]Summer Bloom[/c] is both more difficult to interact with and more powerful than [c]Amulet of Vigor[/c] in the same deck.

tom-martell-bannings-modern

On the other hand, players who have long since given up on Modern argue that the fundamental rule is in itself the problem.

Mattias Kres argues that only [c]Sensei’s Divining Top[/c], [c]Mental Misstep[/c], [c]Hypergenesis[/c], and [c]Stoneforge Mystic[/c] should be banned, leaving everything off the list. The power-level would be similar to Legacy and the last days of Extended, when Zoo ruled the roost.

That’s right, Zoo, an aggro deck, in a field of insanely fast combos.

I don’t know which of these is the better option. I don’t really look forward to both, and also I don’t really mind Modern at the moment.

All I’m concerned about is how to succeed with the hand we’re dealt.

To do this, we have two options.

Option One: Join ‘Em

Aim to win by turn 3. Here’s my most recent attempt to do so on a regular basis.

tumblr_njhrx5Pc0K1tctdpao1_1280

[d title=”Drinkard Infectless Infect (Modern)”]
Land
4 Arid Mesa
4 Windswept Heath
4 Wooded Foothills
1 Stomping Ground
1 Temple Garden
1 Sacred Foundry
1 Forest
1 Mountain

Creatures
4 Wild Nacatl
4 Monastery Swiftspear
4 Goblin Guide
3 Ghor-Clan Rampager
4 Steppe Lynx

Other Spells
4 Gitaxian Probe
4 Mishra’s Bauble
4 Temur Battle Rage
4 Become Immense
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Mutagenic Growth

Sideboard
4 Hooting Mandrills
3 Destructive Revelry
4 Sudden Shock
1 Stony Silence
3 Phyrexian Arena[/d]

This deck is hell-bent on assembling three mana, an attacking creature, four cards in the graveyard, and [c]Become Immense[/c] and [c]Temur Battle Rage[/c] in hand on turn 3.

You have 12 fetches and 8 free cantrips to fill the graveyard and draw more lands and the combo.

The advantages the deck has over Infect include haste creatures and creatures with higher toughness. The benefit of this deck over Super Crazy Zoo is that you can manage your life total more conservatively against Burn.

I have only played in one Daily Event with the deck, and I went 2-2 after losing the die roll and thus two games on turn 3 against Infect. I am interested in developing the deck further, and I am super excited about how effective Delve and Ferocious are in an Eternal format like Modern.

If we don’t want to join the players who are breaking the fundamental turn 4 rule, then we have to beat them. And to beat them, we have to apply the breaks very quickly.

Option Two: Beat ‘Em

I hate these decks.

I would hate myself for entering them into a Daily Event, and my opponents would probably hate Magic after losing to them.

But that’s where we are at.

SF20150106_uheygsfvsf2_icon

[d title=”Humble Red (Modern)”]
Land
22 Snow-Covered Mountain
2 Scrying Sheets

Creatures
4 Boros Reckoner
4 Demigod of Revenge
4 Humble Defector

Other Spells
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Skred
4 Pyroclasm
4 Koth of the Hammer
2 Anger of the Gods
4 Blood Moon
2 Volcanic Fallout [/d]

When I saw [c]Humble Defector[/c], I thought that [c]Skred[/c] Red would be a natural home for him. He provides draw to a deck that sorely needs it, and his drawback is mitigated thanks to the mass-removal spells. He simply draws two and then goes away with the rest of your opponent’s board.

This deck has an answer to everything, and the decks like Affinity, Infect, and Combo Zoo will certainly fold to the amount of removal, but sometimes the wrong answers come up facing the wrong decks.

Time will tell whether additional draw will help here.

Verduran-Enchantress

[d title=”Enchantress (Modern)”]
Land
4 Temple Garden
4 Nykthos, Shrine To Nyx
8 Forest

Creatures
4 Arbor Elf
4 Voyaging Satyr
4 Mesa Enchantress
4 Verduran Enchantress
4 Eidolon of Blossoms

Other Spells
4 Ghostly Prison
4 Sphere of Safety
4 Utopia Sprawl
4 Fertile Ground
4 Overgrowth
4 Garruk Wildspeaker [/d]

This is another take on a different Enchantress list played by MTGO user Brainless96, and his win condition was [c]Banefire[/c].

I’m happy to lock the opponent out of the game, allow my mana-ramp to assemble the pillow fort, and win with [c]Overrun[/c]. Well, sort of happy.

Finally, a brew that wins against Burn and Creature-based aggro decks, but is absolute garbage against everything else.

gatekeeper-of-malakir

[d title=”Mono Black Control (Modern)”]
Land
24 Swamp

Creatures
4 Gatekeeper of Malakir
4 Divinity of Pride

Other Spells
2 Sorin’s Thirst
2 Pharika’s Cure
1 Sorin’s Vengeance
4 Geth’s Verdict
3 Devour Flesh
1 Darkblast
2 Slaughter Pact
3 Phyrexian Arena
2 Go for the Throat
2 Tendrils of Corruption
4 Inquisition of Kozilek [/d]

Like I said, it’s good against Burn and creatures.

It’s a mono-removal deck with a load of 1-for-1s that will get its gas back with [c]Phyrexian Arena[/c]. You’re steadily gaining life, playing lands, and killing threats until you’re ready to win. Destroy creatures, lose to Tron and other control decks. Never a close match.

Enough Diversity?

I don’t know if we’re at an optimal Modern right now. Maybe there is enough diversity, and we are.

There are some decks who are trying to win before turn 4 at all costs. Others are trying to stop them at all costs. Some ride through the middle. That sounds healthy to me, but then when I play in Events, it doesn’t feel as good as it did a few months ago.

Hope this gave you some direction.

-drinkard

Some Modern Cards to Brew Around

Hi all,

This week I’ll be avoiding the bandwagon topics and pick up a few cards that need more decks built around them.

[c]Phyrexian Unlife[/c]

I love [c]Phyrexian Unlife[/c], especially in the current online meta-game. It has seen play in decks such as [c]Ad Nauseam[/c] combo, [c]Enduring Ideal[/c] decks, and Travis Woo’s [c]Death’s Shadow[/c], [c]Spoils of the Vault[/c] deck. With no combo potential whatsoever, it even finds its way into the sideboards of B/W Tokens and Zoo decks. Why? Well, Burn of course!

Burn has minimal draw engine available to it, excepting the few players that are attempting [c]Treasure Cruise[/c] right now. If you can gain a certain amount of life, you buy yourself up to three new draw steps and turns. Burn mitigates this counter-strategy with one of its own: [c]Skullcrack[/c] and [c]Flames of the Bloodhand[/c]. [c]Phyrexian Unlife[/c] bypasses all that and gains you between ten and thirteen life, no exceptions. Since Burn is designed to have twenty damage within its top 10-11 cards, you now have more opportunity to get in the game, interact, and win.

The [c]Enduring Ideal[/c] decks aim to ramp to seven mana using [c]Pentad Prism[/c] and [c]Lotus Bloom[/c]. Over the course of the next turns, the opponent is increasingly constricted with [c]Greater Auramancy[/c], [c]Form of the Dragon[/c], [c]Dovescape[/c], and [c]Phyrexian Unlife[/c], not necessarily in that order. Any time the opponent does successfully knock you below zero, even if it is a combat step of 78 damage, you still begin after that to accumulate poison counters. Then your life total resets to 5 thanks to [c]Form of the Dragon[/c], and you start all over.

So what I hope to answer with this brew is, what if we skip [c]Enduring Ideal[/c] and just try to run out [c]Form of the Dragon[/c] using the same ramping process? It’s very risky in a Burn-heavy metagame, so we’re going to have to give ourselves hexproof.

[d title=”The Great White Hate”]
Land
4 Arid Mesa
4 Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx
8 Plains
4 Rugged Prairie
4 Sacred Foundry

Spells
2 Blood Moon
1 Enduring Ideal
3 Form of the Dragon
4 Ghostly Prison
4 Leyline of Sanctity
4 Lotus Bloom
2 Luminarch Ascension
4 Pentad Prism
4 Phyrexian Unlife
2 Poryphory Nodes
4 Runed Halo
2 Sphere of Safety
[/d]

This is part mono-white Nykthos hate, part [c]Form of the Dragon[/c] and [c]Phyrexian Unlife[/c] combo. Tweaking the deck and practicing with it can be filed under my “things to do.” That being said, I’m tempted to jam [c]Leyline of Sanctity[/c] into the main of many online decks. As of this weekend, I’m 2/3 on cashing with Bogles that includes Leyline in the side and 0/2 on cashing without it.

You may have noticed that lately there has been a prevalence of [c]Ad Nauseam[/c] decks placing in Dailies. I suspect that this has a lot to do with the [c]Phyrexian Unlife[/c] and [c]Angel’s Grace[/c] package the deck has to fight the overwhelming amount of Burn.

[c]Fury of the Horde[/c]

This card creates a win in the [c]Goryo’s Vengeance[/c] deck that is regaining popularity now that everyone wants the turn two kill that [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c] apparently has. It is also used in Travis Woo’s new combo deck built around [c]Narset, Enlightened Master[/c]. I want to build a deck that uses [c]Fury of the Horde[/c] with another Khans card, [c]Howl of the Horde[/c], just in case we need to attack for 80 on turn 3.

[d title=”Raaaaaaaaaaaaaaaid”]
Land
20 Mountain

Creatures
4 Immolating Souleater
4 Kiln Fiend
2 Nivmagus Elemental
4 Simian Spirit Guide

Other Spells
4 Assault Strobe
4 Brute Force
4 Double Cleave
4 Fury of the Horde
4 Ground Rift
4 Howl of the Horde
2 Psychotic Fury[/d]

The sheer amount of redundancy in a deck like this is surely getting close to the breaking point. There are so many different combinations of cards that easily produce a turn three kill. Would it be more resilient with a Rakdos mana-base and some discard disruption? Heck yes, especially in this Delver, Burn-infested metagame. But for the time being, I want to attack with a 1/2 [c]Kiln Fiend[/c] on turn 3, then have three copies of [c]Fury of the Horde[/c] and a 7/2 [c]Kiln Fiend[/c] to take advantage of them. In order to do this, I have to have plenty of red cards.

[c]Ensoul Artifact[/c]

I love Affinity. I love what [c]Ensoul Artifact[/c] has done for Affinity, and that I have a pretty sweet Affinity deck for 100 tix. I sort of cross my fingers in the hopes that [c]Mox Opal[/c] is spoiled for Modern Masters 2 so that this deck becomes more than 100 tix, but I am not a talented shot-caller or speculator.

I also love Infect. Mono Green Infect was a $40 Modern investment that repaid me well over 100 tix in 2-man queues, 8-man queues, and dailies. I bought 4 Noble Hierarchs with my winnings! Eventually, the metagame had too much incidental hate, including Pod’s maindeck [c]Melira, Sylvok Outcast[/c].

When playing Infect, many decks use their life total as a resource in a more aggressive way than they would against any other, more traditional aggro or midrange deck. This is where [c]Noble Hierarch[/c] and a couple of [c]Rancor[/c] enchantments would shore up a lot of games. It would come up at least once in a daily or 8-man for me.

[c]Ensoul Artifact[/c] could serve the same purpose in an Infect deck as Hierarch and [c]Rancor[/c] did, as long as the deck was built a little differently. Here is my take on mono-blue Infect that is built to utilize [c]Ensoul Artifact[/c]. Bonus: We can use [c]Ghostfire Blade[/c] from Khans!

[d title=”Modern Blue Infect”]
Land
4 Darkslick Shores
4 Darksteel Citadel
4 Inkmoth Nexus
2 Island
4 Polluted Delta
2 Watery Grave

Creatures
4 Blighted Agent
4 Ichorclaw Myr
2 Spellskite
4 Vector Asp

Other Spells
4 Aether Vial
4 Cranial Plating
4 Ensoul Artifact
2 Ghostfire Blade
4 Mox Opal
4 Serum Visions
4 Welding Jar[/d]

The real beauty here, besides the multiple angles of attack, is that blue offers us many more sideboard choices to counteract the hosers that exist. We can play [c]Dispel[/c] and [c]Spell Pierce[/c], [c]Unsummon[/c] or [c]Vapor Snag[/c] (the former actually has its merit in this list over the latter!), and [c]Echoing Truth[/c] or other counters.

This deck also has to resolve less spells at the right time to function. The mono green list has to hold up [c]Ranger’s Guile[/c] and [c]Vines of Vastwood[/c] to maintain lethal, and here we can use [c]Aether Vial[/c] at the end of turn to play our threat when the opponent is not prepared. Or we can Vial in a [c]Spellskite[/c] (credit to deluxeicoff here, you can see his U/G lists on stats pages).

I’m fairly devoted to a couple of different lists in Modern right now and have less time to test and practice brews, but if these spark something in you, good luck, have fun!

Closing question: Have you considered what can be done to fix the Modern MTGO metagame that is so littered with burn? Does anything need to be done besides deck adjustments?

-drinkard

A Bite Out of Modern #3: Fighting Ascendancy

Khans is halfway here on MTGO, and already it’s made its mark in all formats. Well, obviously it’s impacting Standard because it replaces an entire amazing block. In fact, the Theros Block Constructed archetype (that was dismissed after Born of the Gods) UW Heroic seems to be the go-to aggro deck right now. We can trust Tom Ross to provide us with the optimal aggro list for most environments, so fans of Aggro and Bogles apply inside.

But Khans is also seeing action in Modern and Legacy as well. In the latter, [c]Treasure Cruise[/c] and [c]Monastery Swiftspear[/c] are already finding their way in U/R Delver, and Cruise will most likely stay. In Modern, there are already pleas for an emergency ban. Smdster and others have used [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c] combo to earn themselves packs for undefeated (in games, even) finishes in Daily Events, and some of those wins were on turns 2 and 3. I suppose people have been turning their heads and looking the other way to turn 1 [c]Amulet of Vigor[/c], turn 2 [c]Summer Bloom[/c] for months (years?) now because they’re asking Wizards to uphold the principle of no Modern wins before turn 4.

How to Stop Worrying and Love Jeskai Ascendancy

Now, I’ll admit that I missed the interactions. I thought that we’ve already seen [c]Intruder Alarm[/c] and only saw how Ascendancy could replace it with something like [c]Sprout Swarm[/c]. I also thought of [c]Lifespark Spellbomb[/c] and concocted a crazy [c]March of the Machines[/c] or [c]Ensoul Artifact[/c] brew with Borderposts. So I goofed. Still, I really don’t think [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c] can remain a big contender. Here is what is good against it, and here is what you can use to take advantage of it if it pops up too much:

1) Spot removal. All removal except for [c]Smelt[/c] is good here. If you can kill a creature or enchantment, you’re well on your way. Yes, [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c] runs tutors and cantrips, so you will be expected to have some more disruption, a fast clock, or a good draw engine to accompany your removal. Because of this, UWR Control, The Rock, and U/R Delver, ever-present forces in the Modern metagame, will keep Ascendancy combo in check.

2) [c]Eidolon of the Great Revel[/c]. Insert everything I’ve posted about Modern Burn here.

3) Hate-bears. [c]Thalia, Guardian of Thraben[/c] and [c]Spirit of the Labyrinth[/c] severely handicap or shut down the Ascendancy combo. For a whopping GGWWR2, the opponent can cast [c]Glittering Wish[/c] to target [c]Fiery Justice[/c] against multiple hate-bears, or for GGBW2, the opponent can cast [c]Abrupt Decay[/c] on a single one. Either way, the tempo gained for the hate-bears player before the opponent can even start to combo is significant. Death and Taxes and G/W hate-bears also run [c]Path to Exile[/c] for the mana dork.

4) Mass removal. Be it [c]Anger of the Gods[/c], [c]Living End[/c], [c]Wrath of God[/c], etc. you have an answer even to [c]Sylvan Caryatid[/c] should the game make him relevant.

5) Discard. It’s a combo deck.

So if you ever see three or more [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c] combo decks place on mtgo-stats, snap submit this deck for a free match of four.

[d title=”Modern Mono Black Infect”]
Land
4 Inkmoth Nexus
17 Swamp
1 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth

Creatures
4 Phyrexian Crusader
4 Phyrexian Vatmother

Spells
2 Devour Flesh
4 Disfigure
3 Doom Blade
4 Funeral Charm
4 Inquisition of Kozilek
1 Phyrexian Arena
4 Raven’s Crime
2 Runechanter’s Pike
3 Sign in Blood
3 Wrench Mind

Sideboard
2 Bile Blight
2 Blackmail
4 Duress
1 Geth’s Verdict
4 Leyline of the Void
2 Slaughter Pact[/d]

I haven’t run the numbers, but the deck is cheap. It does get some free wins, especially against combo and Burn.

Budgetized Modern Decks

Now on to the stuff you came for. Lately there have been a lot of goodies hidden on results pages because they’re mislabeled as Burn decks. Here is the first one from MTGO user Second_Sunrise on September 22 that you may not have caught:

[d title=”Second Sunrise Token Goblins (Modern)”]
Land
16 Mountain
4 Mutavault

Creatures
4 Foundry Street Denizen
3 Goblin Bushwhacker
4 Goblin Guide
4 Legion Loyalist
4 Mogg War Marshall
4 Goblin Chieftain

Spells
3 Dragon Fodder
3 Goblin Grenade
3 Krenko’s Command
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Shared Animosity

Sideboard
3 Combust
2 Dismember
4 Goblin Assault
2 Relic of Progenitus
4 Smash to Smithereens[/d]

He brought home some packs with only $80 invested, including the Daily Event entry fee. I assumed some people would run goblins after Rabblemaster was released, but he is absent from this list despite the obvious synergy. Maybe he pushed too high on the curve.

I love [c]Goblin Grenade[/c] in Modern. After the damage done to oneself by their mana-base alone, drawing into 2 grenades over the course of the game gets really close to lethal. Your opponent can never really trust his life total as you assess what he virtually has due to the cards in your hand.

I don’t love [c]Shared Animosity[/c] in this deck. I preferred the decks that maxed out with 12 Goblin Lords (Chieftain, King, and Bushwhacker) and rounded out the deck with 8 burn spells to finish the opponent off. I hate Animosity as a topdeck, especially against B/G or U/W/R when the opponent has been answering our creatures anyway.

It is interesting that Modern Goblins don’t have a good presence when they are powerful in Legacy. Then you consider what elements the Legacy Goblins deck has: a draw engine in [c]Goblin Ringleader[/c], tempo in [c]Goblin Lackey[/c] and [c]Goblin Warchief[/c], a fast clock with [c]Goblin Piledriver[/c], and disruption with [c]Wasteland[/c] and [c]Rishadan Port[/c]. None of these cards are available in Modern, so if one was looking for a disruptive tribal aggro deck, they looked to Merfolk. Still, while those cards weren’t available, I think that people have been too quick to dismiss a midrange or aggro-control Goblins list. We have [c]Aether Vial[/c], [c]Blood Moon[/c] and [c]Magus of the Moon[/c], [c]Thorn of Amethyst[/c], and [c]Warren Instigator[/c] at our disposal. I’m not ready to discredit these options and just go for a deck that only aims to draw, cast, turn creatures sideways, say “go” just yet.

A Snow-Control red deck sneaked into the results pages disguised as a Burn deck as well. You can look to this for some free wins against [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c] as well, and it only runs you 100 tix.

[d title=”GG_Glen Snow Control (Modern)”]
Land
2 Scrying Sheets
22 Snow-Covered Mountain

Creatures
4 Boros Reckoner
4 Demigod of Revenge

Other Spells
4 Anger of the Gods
4 Blood Moon
1 Burning Earth
4 Koth of the Hammer
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Relic of Progenitus
1 Pyroclasm
4 Skred
2 Volcanic Fallout

Sideboard
2 Boil
1 Combust
2 Dragon’s Claw
4 Guttural Response
2 Molten Rain
2 Shattering Blow
2 Shatterstorm[/d]

I have to admit I’m impressed and confused at the same time. In the main, I’m not sure what the Demigods are up to hanging out with [c]Relic of Progenitus[/c] except that maybe a flying haste attack for 5 is sometimes enough to call it a day. I suppose I can accept them as a budget alternative to [c]Thundermaw Hellkite[/c] and [c]Stormbreath Dragon[/c], but I really like the latter a lot in these lists.

In the sideboard the number of [c]Dragon’s Claw[/c] is surely off if that is a strategy to defeat Burn. Otherwise, the Burn matchup looks horrid, and the odds of drawing 1 of 2 are low. Otherwise I love the deck strategy and think it can be a contender in the post-Khans metagame if Ascendancy and Zoo come out of the woodwork.

Imagine a Standard deck

Now imagine it with [c]Goblin Guide[/c] and [c]Vexing Devil[/c].

This week there is further evidence that sometimes Aggro is just barely good enough to get there. What should a player do when their pet deck is rotating out of Standard? Play it in Modern, of course! At least, that’s what user b3nnybnyhc did on October 6. This deck looks familiar to those that follow multiple formats, especially those that scour the formats for well-priced decks that place.

[d title=”Modern Boss Sligh by b3nnybnyhc”]
Land
18 Mountain

Creatures
4 Ash Zealot
4 Eidolon of the Great Revel
4 Firedrinker Satyr
4 Goblin Guide
1 Grim Lavamancer
4 Legion Loyalist
4 Rakdos Cackler
4 Vexing Devil

Spells
4 Brute Force
1 Forked Bolt
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Titan’s Strength

Sideboard
1 Blood Moon
1 Dismember
1 Forked Bolt
1 Grafdigger’s Cage
1 Gut Shot
1 Leyline of Punishment
3 Relic of Progenitus
2 Shattering Spree
2 Skullcrack
2 Smash to Smithereens[/d]

So will Burn players breathe some fresh air from the prison of [c]Leyline of Sanctity[/c] and try this out? I question it, and the bulk of the expense in this deck is cards that are also in Mono-Red Burn. Still, it is something to consider if enough players are giving themselves Hexproof or gaining life. Each of the creatures may only amount to a [c]Shock[/c], but they can also amount to more than a [c]Lava Axe[/c] for one or two. Seeing the deck reminds me that [c]Vexing Devil[/c] should have gone into my [c]Experiment One[/c] R/G beats last week, and I’ve been brewing that list backwards and forwards, trying things like [c]Keldon Marauders[/c], [c]Lightning Crafter[/c], etc. I’m sure I’ll settle on something by the time [c]Wooded Foothills[/c] drops to a reasonable price.

What do you all think about [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c] combo? Is it just a Glittering Wish, or will it continue to show its Prowess? Is Aggro the most reliable way to win packs on a budget?

-drinkard

Unified Will: Mono-Green Poison

Hi all,

The goal of the first in this article series, published as often as [c]Inspiration[/c] permits, is to expand a single strategy into multiple eternal formats (Vintage, Legacy, Modern, and Pauper) for players who either:

1) Want to try player run events in a new format.

2) Are unable to play their favorite format in dailies because of the awkward event schedule (spoiler alert, keep this in mind).

I want the strategies to be competitive, and the budgets will range from $100 for three formats to $200, or of course their equivalent in tickets. For ease of the process, I will simply plug all of the cards into one online vendor, but of course know that using penny bots and shopping around will save money.

Interestingly, sharing a strategy between formats is more difficult than it looks. Consider Goblins, for example. Since Vintage Masters has been released, the deck has plummeted in value, so the time is right to buy in. Here is a list that posted 3-1 in 2 Legacy Dailies this past month:

[d title=”Jrickard Goblins”]

Lands

2 Bloodstained Mire

20 Mountain

Creatures

4 Gempalm Incinerator

2 Goblin Chieftain

4 Goblin Lackey

4 Goblin Matron

4 Goblin Piledriver

4 Goblin Ringleader

1 Goblin Sharpshooter

4 Goblin Warchief

1 Krenko, Mob Boss

2 Siege-Gang Commander

1 Skirk Prospector

1 Tuktuk Scrapper

Other Spells

4 Aether Vial

2 Tarfire[/d]

Now for $60, you really can’t do much better in Legacy. This deck has so much reach, with uncounterable creatures (personally, I’d take [c]Cavern of Souls[/c] over [c]Bloodstained Mire[/c], but I’m not the one making money on the list), [c]Goblin Ringleader[/c], and the four [c]Goblin Matron[/c] for tutoring. This isn’t like your Modern aggro list; I’ve won a surprising number of games in practice against Nic Fit loaded with [c]Pernicious Deed[/c], [c]Terminus[/c] miracles, and other decks that go for the long game. Still, it can stand toe-to-toe with Dredge and Burn as well, which you’re going to have to be ready for in events today.

So what’s the problem, then? Well, when you port this to Modern, you’ll find that you share 2 cards: 2 [c]Goblin Chieftain[/c]. This is very disappointing. Actually, due to the differences in the lists, I think Modern Goblins, with its [c]Goblin Guide[/c], [c]Goblin Bushwhacker[/c], and [c]Shared Animosity[/c] have some things to learn here and should be going mid-range, especially considering how good [c]Blood Moon[/c] is in the format. But I digress.

The point here is that we want to try and have an archetype that shares as many cards as possible between formats, and the first answer is Poison.

Mono-Green Poison has been quite infectious online lately.* Some time earlier in the year, results of a $35 deck peaked the attention of quite a few players, and very little innovation has been required for the deck to top 8 a number of Modern Premier Events, winning one, and routinely cashing in dailies as well. I myself won at least a booster box of Theros block packs with the deck in 2-man and 8-man queues and 2 daily events (I am an example of the #2 reason above).

*I actually changed the title from “Mono Green Infect” to “Mono Green Poison” for this pun. Nailed it.

Here is the list I used to pay for a playset of Noble Hierarchs:

[d title=”Mono Green Infect”]

Lands

1 Cathedral of War

14 Forest

4 Inkmoth Nexus

1 Pendelhaven

Creatures

4 Glistener Elf

4 Ichorclaw Myr

4 Noble Hierarch

Other spells

4 Apostle’s Blessing

4 Giant Growth

4 Groundswell

4 Mutagenic Growth

4 Rancor

4 Sylvan Scrying

4 Vines of Vastwood

Sideboard

4 Dismember

4 Nature’s Claim

2 Spellskite

4 Tormod’s Crypt

1 Viridian Corrupter[/d]

This list parted ways in a few areas from the Infect standard floating around. I asked myself, “What happens when we throw money on a budget list?” And played 4 Hierarch main and 2 Spellskite in the side. I won’t talk about this list much because it isn’t the final we’re going with, but I will explain a few choices.

First of all, the Hierarch won me a handful of games against opponents that did not value their life total. One or two [c]Rancor[/c], a handful of pump, and a couple exalted triggers, and the opponent was toast, even with [c]Melira, Sylvok Outcast[/c] or what have you. Beyond that, Hierarch developed my board, gave me extra green mana (something the deck is hungry for when going off), allowed me to play turn 2 [c]Sylvan Scrying[/c] and drop the [c]Inkmoth Nexus[/c].

That brings me to the next distinguished card: [c]Sylvan Scrying[/c]. This is practically [c]Demonic Tutor[/c] here. Want protection from [c]Electrolyze[/c], [c]Pyroclasm[/c], or [c]Grim Lavamancer[/c]? [c]Pendelhaven[/c]. Want pump? [c]Cathedral of War[/c]. Most importantly, want the most effective win condition in your deck? [c]Inkmoth Nexus[/c].

Still, this list isn’t inherently optimal. A lot of the differences you see in Mono Green Infect lists simply are based on play-style. The [c]Noble Hierarch[/c] does make you softer to [c]Zealous Persecution[/c], [c]Electrolyze[/c], and mass removal, which is relevant, so that expenditure isn’t necessary.

Here, instead, is a more stock list, which is significantly more budget-friendly:

[d title=”Modern Mono Green Infect”]

Land

4 Cathedral of War

13 Forest

4 Inkmoth Nexus

1 Pendelhaven

Creatures

4 Glistener Elf

4 Ichorclaw Myr

Other spells

4 Apostle’s Blessing

2 Dismember

4 Giant Growth

4 Groundswell

4 Mutagenic Growth

4 Rancor

4 Sylvan Scrying

4 Vines of Vastwood

Sideboard

1 Creeping Corrosion

2 Dismember

2 Guttural Response

4 Nature’s Claim

2 Ranger’s Guile

4 Tormod’s Crypt[/d]

Here are a few tips with playing the deck, from the beginning of the game until the end.

Mulligan until you have a creature in hand, as if you were playing Bogles.

On the first turn on the play, not knowing what you’re up against, it is better to play [c]Cathedral of War[/c] than [c]Glistener Elf[/c]. I may get some disagreement here from people, but I think a turn 2 Elf representing [c]Apostle’s Blessing[/c] than an attempt to win early and just lose your condition. On the draw, when you see a blue mana source, it is probably better to play the Elf before your opponent has counter mana available.

Before you make a land drop, consider how much you need, and that a [c]Groundswell[/c] may pop up later.

Don’t [c]Pendelhaven[/c] or otherwise pump your creature first unless you can win. Your pump doubles as protection.

Wait until you have enough pump in hand plus an [c]Apostle’s Blessing[/c] or [c]Vines of Vastwood[/c] before going off. Remember that [c]Apostle’s Blessing[/c] also makes your creature unblockable in a lot of situations, but be wary of things like [c]Vendilion Clique[/c].

This is actually a midrange combo deck that, when against Tron, Storm, Ad Nauseam, etc. shifts into the turns 2-3 combo deck.

Every game, just side out the 4 [c]Mutagenic Growth[/c] for 4 cards that fit except against Affinity and Burn, where you also side out the 2 [c]Dismember[/c]. Over-sideboarding can really hurt your plan.

When porting to Legacy, however, we simply have to go for it. This is an especially nice time to go for it because Vintage Masters has given us [c]Berserk[/c] at a ridiculously low price. Here is my submission for a turn 2 combo Mono Green Infect deck in Legacy:

[d title=”Legacy Mono Green Infect”]

Land

1 Dryad Arbor

14 Forest

4 Inkmoth Nexus

1 Pendelhaven

Creatures

4 Elvish Spirit Guide

4 Glistener Elf

Other Spells

4 Apostle’s Blessing

4 Berserk

4 Crop Rotation

4 Green Sun’s Zenith

4 Groundswell

4 Invigorate

4 Rancor

4 Vines of Vastwood

Sideboard

1 Bojuka Bog

1 Ghost Quarter

2 Guttural Response

4 Nature’s Claim

2 Ranger’s Guile

1 Sylvan Safekeeper

1 Tormod’s Crypt

3 Viridian Corrupter[/d]

Now we see between the two lists that we share 47/75 cards, and besides the [c]Elvish Spirit Guide[/c] playset, we don’t have to invest much more money. The core cards of the Legacy combo are actually quite cheap: [c]Berserk[/c], [c]Invigorate[/c], and [c]Crop Rotation[/c].

This deck aims to be much faster than the Modern version; it has to be. [c]Crop Rotation[/c] can work as a creature in your opening hand, but it is best to find [c]Inkmoth Nexus[/c], [c]Glistener Elf[/c], or [c]Green Sun’s Zenith[/c].  Turn 2 or 3, play [c]Invigorate[/c] and [c]Berserk[/c]. As always, a few tips:

Remember to rotate your [c]Inkmoth Nexus[/c] for another if their removal does get through.

Be wary of [c]Terminus[/c]. When you have the budget, move for [c]Bayou[/c] and [c]Abrupt Decay[/c].

Use [c]Bojuka Bog[/c] at instant speed during your Dredge opponent’s draw phase, before they’re able to cast [c]Cabal Therapy[/c].

The deck’s good matchups are Dredge and Burn, which is good, because these two are played quite frequently online right now. It seems counterintuitive that a deck depending on low-toughness creatures would be good against Burn, but in practice, I always know that I’m going to win whenever the Burn player starts focusing on my creatures. It spreads his offensive too thin.

And finally, if we want to queue up another event or enter a Player Run Event on a new night, we move to Pauper. A lot of our cards are common, after all.

[d title=”Pauper Mono Green Infect”]

Land

18 Forest

Creatures

2 Cystbearer

4 Glistener Elf

4 Ichorclaw Myr

4 Llanowar Augur

2 Rot Wolf

Other Spells

4 Apostle’s Blessing

4 Giant Growth

4 Groundswell

4 Mutagenic Growth

2 Predator’s Strike

4 Rancor

4 Vines of Vastwood

Sideboard

1 Corpse Cur

2 Fog

4 Hornet Sting

4 Nature’s Claim

1 Nourish

2 Pistus Strike

1 Tormod’s Crypt[/d]

*Deck has been edited for format legality and per suggestions of someone with more format experience.

This deck operates between the two others and can take the early combo role or the longer protective role. The biggest difference between the formats is the number of Edict effects in Pauper make your creatures more vulnerable; in other formats, [c]Ranger’s Guile[/c], [c]Vines of Vastwood[/c], and [c]Apostle’s Blessing[/c] save you.

What is our grand total, then, to play Infect in three formats? Well, the cost of the Modern deck that has been placing is $53.40.

As of July 11, 2014, the grand total for all three decks is $83.43. We only added $30 to have a strong option in two other formats.

The fun, number, though, is the cost shared between Modern and Legacy: $33.66. If you want to play Legacy on a budget, essentially you can have a Modern deck for $20 of leftover costs.

In the next article we will bring Burn in three formats. Where this article is geared to the Johnnies and Timmies, the Burn article is for Spikes, grinders, and lovers of the double queue. In the meantime, thanks for your time and comments!

-Drinkard

[email protected]

drinkard on mtgo

You Too Can Play Modern: 10 Budget Modern Decks

The current economic crisis is being really hard on all our non-essentials, and Magic: the Gathering is an expensive game. Very expensive, in fact, when you decide to play a competitive format like Modern. Even if Wizard’s intention was creating a format that could be played by those who could not afford Legacy, the truth is tier 1 decks cost around 800 euros ($1,100) on average, and that’s a lot of money. Wizards is, I am sure, working on it and we’ll see reprints of the biggest offenders sooner or later. For the time being, though, it is difficult to start playing this wonderful format.

Or is it?

There are cheap decks that can be built for around 100€ ($135), and then there are versions of more expensive decks that can be built also for this approximate quantity. Which option is better depends on your priorities: I decided, when I built my first Modern deck, to start building a UR [c]Delver of Secrets[/c] deck, and to wait until I could afford [c]Snapcaster Mage[/c]. But I have friends who decided to start with Burn or Soul Sisters, and they had way better results at the beginning, which allowed them to get some store credit, which allowed them to build more expensive decks afterwards.

Anyhow, let’s have a look at some lists!

[d title=”Burn”]
LANDS
10 Mountain
4 Mana Confluence
4 City of Brass
2 Gemstone Mine

CREATURES
4 Goblin Guide
4 Vexing Devil

SPELLS
4 Bump in the Night
4 Boros Charm
4 Lava Spike
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Magma Jet
4 Rift Bolt
4 Shard Volley
4 Skullcrack
[/d]

Stay with me for a while, and don’t dismiss Burn at first sight. It is a consistent deck, it doesn’t depend on any particular card, it works, it is fun to play, and it is cheap, especially if we don’t use the classic fetch/shock lands, which we don’t need to use. If the deck works, we can perfectly afford to lose some life using [c]City of Brass[/c] and [c]Mana Confluence[/c], as the opponent will be too busy losing to take advantage of the situation.

On the other hand, it is one of those decks where mulligans hurt bad, and every game is a bit of a lottery. You can trust your top-decks, and the deck does not tend to let you down, but there is little you can do if it does. Also, there is some very specific sideboard against burn, and we lose chances every turn. Despite all that, the deck wins, and punishes durdly and slow decks like no other.

[d title=”Living End”]
LANDS
4 Blackcleave Cliffs
4 Copperline Gorge
2 Evolving Wilds
4 Forest
5 Mountain
5 Swamp

CREATURES
4 Deadshot Minotaur
2 Fulminator Mage
2 Jungle Weaver
1 Shriekmaw
4 Street Wraith
4 Pale Recluse
2 Beast Within
2 Avalanche Riders
4 Monstruous Carabid

SPELLS
4 Demonic Dread
3 Living End
4 Violent Outburst
[/d]

Living End is a pretty straightforward combo deck which had a recent spike in popularity thanks to the banning of [c]Deathrite Shaman[/c]. There is still a healthy amount of graveyard hate in Modern, but now graveyard-related strategies have a lot better pre-board situation, at least.

The combo goes as follows: we cycle big creatures, then we play a cascade spell (cascade spells allow you to reveal cards from the top of your deck until you find a spell that costs less than the one with cascade, then you play that spell), and that cascade spell can only hit [c]Living End[/c], which will be put in play without suspend, and bring back all the creatures we originally cycled, at the same time it puts all the creatures in the opponent’s side in their graveyard.

It is a fragile combo though. It is too easy for any deck with access to counterspells to counter Living End, and sometimes the deck just fails to work because we draw all our copies of [c]Living End[/c] before we can cascade into one (believe me, it happens!). But it is a really fun deck to play, and it has had some very solid results. Also, the deck can be built for extremely cheap if we substitute [c]Fulminator Mage[/c] for any other cheaper card.

[d title=”Soul Sisters”]
LANDS
21 Plains

CREATURES
4 Ajani’s Pridemate
3 Kitchen Finks
2 Martyr of Sands
2 Ranger of Eos
4 Serra Ascendant
4 Soul Warden
4 Soul’s Attendant
4 Squadron Hawk

SPELLS
4 Honor of the Pure
4 Path to Exile
4 Spectral Procession
[/d]

This deck comes from a Standard list that appeared for a brief period of time during which [c]Soul Warden[/c] and [c]Soul’s Attendant[/c] were both legal in the format. That didn’t last, but then Modern became a good soil for this idea to grow, bloom, and give fruit in the form of games won and burn decks humiliated.

It is a good deck, in my opinion, even though it is rather non-interactive (which is something that can apply to many of the decks here, to be honest). The life gain gives it an edge against aggro decks, and it tends to have good top-decks as everything synergizes with everything.

There is a rather interesting variant using [c]Norin the Wary[/c], which ensures constant Enter The Battlefield triggers. Also, having red allows for some other tools, like [c]Lightning Bolt[/c] and [c]Boros Charm[/c].

[d title=”Mono U Tron”]
LANDS
1 Academy Ruins
8 Island
1 Oboro, Palace in the Clouds
1 Tectonic Edge
4 Urza’s Mine
4 Urza’s Power Plant
4 Urza’s Tower

CREATURES
1 Platinum Angel
3 Solemn Simulacrum
1 Myr Battlesphere
1 Sundering Titan
3 Treasure Mage
1 Wurmcoil Engine

SPELLS
4 Condescend
1 Cyclonic Rift
4 Expedition Map
2 Mindslaver
1 Oblivion Stone
4 Remand
3 Repeal
1 Spell Burst
3 Talisman of Dominance
4 Thirst for Knowledge
[/d]

I have not tried this one personally yet, but I have played against it and I can confirm it is very, very effective. It’s a mix of control and ramp, and a very good one at that: the opponent will find themselves facing huge creatures and difficult board states in no time.

There is a combo inside this deck too: [c]Mindslaver[/c] + [c]Academy Ruins[/c] means our opponent will never control his own turns again, which means we have won. It has the usual weaknesses of ramp decks: early game is not fantastic, and the engine has to be set up. Blue allows for some control and tempo which make it easier for the deck to get into the mid- and late-game though, as well as some card draw/selection, so we can trust the deck to deliver the cards we need.

[d title=”Stompy”]
LANDS
22 Forest

CREATURES
4 Experiment One
4 Dryad Militant
4 Scavenging Ooze
2 Kalonian Tusker
2 Skylasher
4 Strangleroot Geist
2 Leatherback Baloth
2 Thrun, the Last Troll

SPELLS
4 Rancor
4 Giant Growth
4 Vines of Vastwood
2 Beast Within
[/d]

This is right up my alley. Aggro, creatures, tricks. This deck has not yet proven itself to be a big contender in the Modern metagame, but I consider this to be a solid list. Graveyard hate is built-in thanks to [c]Dryad Militant[/c] and [c]Scavenging Ooze[/c], the creatures are abundant and big, and green is also a great color for sideboarding, having access to artifact and enchantment hate.

Stompy, however, is a new deck and as such it could very well fizzle and just not work well enough. I am stoked, but it could pay to be cautious.

[d title=”WB Tokens”]
LANDS
10 Plains
4 Swamp
4 Isolated chapel
4 Godless shrine

CREATURES
2 Doomed Traveller
3 Tidehollow Sculler

SPELLS
3 Sorin, Lord of Innistrad
4 Inquisition of Kozilek
4 Intangible Virtue
4 Zealous Persecution
4 Lingering Souls
2 Midnight Haunting
4 Path to Exile
4 Raise the Alarm
4 Spectral Procession
[/d]

First things first: this list was made before the Modern Event Deck was released. If you like this deck and can find the Modern Event Deck for a good price, by all means start there. It is a good value.

WB tokens is as full of tools as the night full of terrors. Black and white is a very good color combination and makes dealing with anything a breeze. Also, this deck plays so many creatures the opponent has to be prepared against this or just lose: spot removal just won’t work.

Keep in mind though, there is a good amount of sideboard available for the kind of board states WB tokens creates, and it is extremely devastating.

[d title=”GU Infect”]
LANDS
4 Breeding Pool
3 Gemstone Mine
4 Forest
3 Hinterland Harbor
4 Inkmoth Nexus
2 Pendelhaven

CREATURES
4 Blighted Agent
4 Glistener Elf
4 Ichorclaw Myr
2 Plague Myr

SPELLS
4 Apostle’s Blessing
4 Groundswell
4 Might of Old Krosa
4 Mutagenic Growth
4 Rancor
2 Distortion Strike
4 Vines of Vastwood
[/d]

Infect takes a shortcut on the aggro approach, makes pump spells twice as effective, and makes the whole metagame understand how important it is to have early removal against this. It has never been a tier 1 deck, but still it has won tournaments and is a constant threat against any unprepared opponent. This is the sort of deck that keep players on their toes, and that’s a good thing.

It is a bit weak against removal, and edict effects tend to kill it dead (the deck usually runs fewer than 15 creatures), but it still is a very good option that will deliver swift kills.

[d title=”Melira Pod”]
LANDS
3 Evolving Wilds
6 Forest
4 Overgrown Tomb
2 Plains
7 Swamp
2 Temple Garden

CREATURES
4 Birds of Paradise
1 Eternal Witness
1 Farhaven Elf
2 Fauna Shaman
1 Gravedigger
1 Harmonic Sliver
4 Kitchen Finks
4 Melira, Sylvok Outcast
3 Murderous Redcap
1 Qasali Pridemage
1 Ranger of Eos
1 Safehold Elite
1 Shriekmaw
3 Sylvan Caryatid
1 Varolz, the Scar-Striped
3 Viscera Seer

SPELLS
4 Birthing Pod
[/d]

This is more of an experiment than an actual deck. You see, Melira Pod is arguably the best modern deck in existence, and there are people who fall in love with it the second they look at the Modern format, only to be let down by the price tag attached to it. It made sense to try and make a budget version, and the core of the deck is not especially expensive.

The good thing about Pod is its toolbox approach. This also makes getting the pieces for the deck easier, as they are a lot of times one-ofs. The bad part is it requires three colours, which, in Modern, means fetchlands. And you’re going to need play-sets of those. Also, [c]Chord of calling[/c] is really expensive, as is [c]Noble Hierarch[/c].

So, take this as a starting point. And pray [c]Birthing Pod[/c] doesn’t get banned.

[d title=”Hexproof Auras”]
LANDS
7 Forest
6 Plains
4 Razorverge Thicket
2 Sunpetal Grove
2 Temple Garden

CREATURES
4 Gladecover Scout
4 Slippery Bogle
4 Kor Spiritdancer

SPELLS
4 Ethereal Armor
4 Hyena Umbra
4 Keen Sense
3 Path to Exile
4 Rancor
4 Spirit Mantle
4 Unflinching Courage
[/d]

This is essentially the full deck minus [c]Daybreak Coronet[/c] and with a cheaper land base. It is a beautiful deck and the definition of both Voltron and Timmy. This is, of course, my opinion: some people use this deck to explain why the Modern format is essentially flawed.

Hexproof Auras puts a lot of pressure on the opponent. It builds a huge, untargettable beast, attaching auras to a hexproof creature. Spot removal is useless, dealing X damage tends to be insufficient, and blocking is futile – hence the success of the deck. Edicts and counter-magic can still hurt us, of course, but your opponent has to have it in his hand.

I needn’t convince you, though. There is a type of player for this type of deck. If you’re that type, you already know it.

[d title=”PyroDelver”]
LANDS
10 Island
2 Mountain
4 Steam Vents
4 Sulfur Falls

CREATURES
4 Delver of Secrets
2 Grim Lavamancer
4 Spellstutter Sprite
4 Young Pyromancer

SPELLS
2 Electrolyze
4 Gitaxian Probe
4 Lightning Bolt
2 Mana Leak
2 Pillar of Flame
4 Remand
4 Serum Visions
2 Spell Pierce
2 Vapor Snag
[/d]

UR Delver, or PyroDelver as I sometimes call it ([c]Young Pyromancer[/c] is just as central as [c]Delver of Secrets[/c] in this deck), is a great, great deck that has to be practiced and studied but which rewards the pilot with options against every deck in the meta. It does not deliver as many free kills as some other decks in this list (even though a couple of flipped delvers in the first couple of turns can mean a quick death for the opponent if they don’t have adequate removal), but it is consistent thanks to its card draw and selection, and is a very difficult deck to deal with while we are ahead in the game. It has some good recoveries too, thanks to [c]Young Pyromancer[/c].

The bad part is I had to cut some pretty important cards to make it a budget deck, and I’m not sure about this new list. [c]Spellstutter Sprite is great[/c], but its slot is normally occupied by [c]Snapcaster Mage[/c], which is really important to the deck; [c]Blood Moon[/c] is a central card here which improves the chances against some important decks; and fetchlands are pretty much a must too, as they improve the deck’s consistency.

Well, there you go. 10 Modern lists you can try out that won’t break the bank. Do you have a favorite? Do you play a different budget deck in Modern with any success? Let me know if the comments!