Power Level In Commander

Welcome back,

Its been awhile. Quite a while actually. I think its been about eight or nine months since my last post. Sometimes life gets in the way of things, but you move on through it. Anyway, I’m glad to be back writing and making content for you wonderful guys and gals.

During my time off, I’ve been working on new decks, and tweaking old ones to perfection. Decks have come and gone, ideas have been tested and trashed, and playgroups have moved on. [c]Melek, Izzet Paragon[/c] has been a deck that I’ve been playing since I started Magic, and I’ve ended up having to move on from that, sad as it is to say.

Over the course of eight months, I edited the deck, and the power of it crept up to the point where my playgroup just did not want to play with me anymore. I ended up feeling like I created a monster, but didn’t realize it. I mostly just told myself that it was their fault for playing bad cards, and building bad decks. I never looked at myself, and what I ended up doing. I powered up my deck to the point where it was far and away the best thing to be doing at the table. There was no contest. Every game I won by a landslide.

For those of you who don’t remember the deck when I discussed it many moons ago, the core concept of the deck was to win via [c]Bribery[/c] based effects. Cards like [c]Blatant Thievery[/c], [c]Treachery[/c], and [c]Acquire[/c], were the back bone of the decks basic strategy. It was a control deck that attacked on a unique axis, and was designed to scale with any playgroup, as it was only as powerful as your opponents cards. Here is the original list for reference.

[d title=”Melek, Izzet Paragon (EDH)”]
Commander
1 Melek, Izzet Paragon

Lands
1 Terramorphic Expanse
1 Terrain Generator
1 Sulfur Falls
1 Steam Vents
1 Shivan Reef
1 Shinka, the Bloodsoaked Keep
1 Reliquary Tower
10 Mountain
1 Minamo, School at Water’s Edge
1 Izzet Guildgate
1 Izzet Boilerworks
12 Island
1 Halimar Depths
1 Evolving Wilds
1 Desolate Lighthouse
1 Command Tower [/d]

[d]
Creatures
1 Vesuvan Shapeshifter
1 Teferi, Mage of Zhalfir
1 Talrand, Sky Summoner
1 Phyrexian Metamorph
1 Nivix Guildmage
1 Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind
1 Niv-Mizzet, Dracogenius
1 Kheru Spellsnatcher
1 Keranos, God of Storms
1 Izzet Chronarch
1 Hypersonic Dragon
1 Goblin Electromancer
1 Galvanoth
1 Clever Impersonator [/d]

[d]
Instants
1 Turn // Burn
1 Spell Crumple
1 Smash to Smithereens
1 Rapid Hybridization
1 Pongify
1 Mystical Tutor
1 Muddle the Mixture
1 Lightning Bolt
1 Izzet Charm
1 Hinder
1 Fire // Ice
1 Fact or Fiction
1 Electrolyze
1 Desertion
1 Cyclonic Rift
1 Comet Storm
1 Chaos Warp
1 Capsize
1 Brainstorm [/d]

[d]
Sorceries
1 Treasure Cruise
1 Telemin Performance
1 Stolen Goods
1 Spelltwine
1 Preordain
1 Ponder
1 Past in Flames
1 Mizzium Mortars
1 Merchant Scroll
1 Knowledge Exploitation
1 Gitaxian Probe
1 Faithless Looting
1 Epic Experiment
1 Chain Lightning
1 Bribery
1 Bonfire of the Damned
1 Blatant Thievery
1 Blasphemous Act
1 Acquire [/d]

[d]
Enchantments
1 Treachery

Artifacts
1 Sphinx-Bone Wand
1 Sol Ring
1 Sensei’s Divining Top
1 Scroll Rack
1 Izzet Signet
1 Gilded Lotus
1 Darksteel Ingot
1 Coalition Relic

Planeswalkers
1 Tamiyo, the Moon Sage
1 Dack Fayden
[/d]

The deck was simple, powerful, and fun. I loved everything about it. It played so well, and was reasonably competitive with the rest of the playgroup. Over time I refined it, cut the excess win conditions, changed the commander, and dumped a lot of money and power into it. To me, it was the same deck I’ve known and loved for all these years, not so much to my friends.

It became oppressive and ruthless. It reflected on what how I ended up playing the game. I naturally lean towards a spike, and that desire to win above all else showed. Instead of playing political, I was just playing the bad guy every time. I wasn’t out for fun, I was out to win. I wouldn’t let anything stand in my way of dominating the board, and ensuring my victory. In the end, this is what I turned it into.

[d title= “Mizzix of the Izmagnus (EDH)”]
Commander
1 Mizzix of the Izmagnus

Lands

1 Blighted Cataract
1 Cascade Bluffs
1 Command Tower
1 Desolate Lighthouse
1 Evolving Wilds
1 Halimar Depths
10 Island
1 Izzet Boilerworks
1 Izzet Guildgate
1 Minamo, School at Water’s Edge
9 Mountain
1 Reliquary Tower
1 Shinka, the Bloodsoaked Keep
1 Shivan Reef
1 Steam Vents
1 Sulfur Falls
1 Swiftwater Cliffs
1 Terrain Generator
1 Terramorphic Expanse

Creatures
1 Clever Impersonator
1 Gigantoplasm
1 Goblin Electromancer
1 Jace, Vryn’s Prodigy
1 Phyrexian Metamorph[/d]

[d]
Instants
1 Blue Sun’s Zenith
1 Brainstorm
1 Capsize
1 Chaos Warp
1 Comet Storm
1 Counterflux
1 Counterspell
1 Cryptic Command
1 Cyclonic Rift
1 Dig Through Time
1 Dominate
1 Electrolyze
1 Fact or Fiction
1 Firemind’s Foresight
1 Force of Will
1 Izzet Charm
1 Lightning Bolt
1 Magmaquake
1 Muddle the Mixture
1 Mystic Confluence
1 Mystical Tutor
1 Pongify
1 Prophetic Bolt
1 Smash to SMithereens
1 Stroke of Genius
1 Turn//Burn[/d]

[d]
1 Acquire
1 Blatent Thievery
1 Bonfire of the Damned
1 Bribery
1 Chain Lightning
1 Faithless Looting
1 Gitaxian Probe
1 Knowledge Exploitation
1 Merchant Scroll
1 Mizzium Mortars
1 Mizzix’s Mastery
1 Ponder
1 Preordain
1 Roast
1 Spelltwine
1 Telemin Performance
1 Tezzeret’s Gambit
1 Treasure Cruise
1 Volcanic Vision

Enchantment
1 Treachery[/d]

[d]
Artifacts
1 Coalition Relic
1 Darksteel INgot
1 Gilded Lotus
1 Izzet SIgnet
1 Pyromancer’s Goggles
1 Scroll Rack
1 Sensei’s Divining Top
1 Sol Ring
1 Sphinx-Bone Wand
1 Thought Vessel

Planeswalkers
1 Dack Fayden
1 Tamiyo, the Moon Sage[/d]

While it might not seem like much, these upgrades outclassed anything that my playgroup was doing. My group was mostly casual guys and girls who just played their favorite cards, and had fun with them. They didn’t have the income to afford the more expensive options, so they played what they had.

I didn’t exactly follow that trend though. I bought the best things I could, outside of [c]Volcanic Island[/c] and fetchlands, and just made the best deck I could possibly make to crush everybody. What ended up happening is that people just didn’t want to play with me anymore. People left the playgroup, and cited my deck as the reason for them leaving. They just wanted to have a good time, and when I wandered in, they didn’t let me play anymore. People refused to play games with me because they knew that they would loose.

Once I started losing out on games, and friends, it finally hit me. I had forgotten what I loved about the format in the first place. When I started playing Commander, I loved that all my favorite cards where viable. I loved the wacky shenanigans and high-jinks that ensue whenever a game is played. I waited for the long nights where we made the mistake of mixing Planechase and Commander. I lost sight of what the format was about.

So I decided to take a step back and reevaluate what I was doing. Back to the drawing board I went, and changed my deck for the better. I powered it down, and added a Commander that is a bit more fun due to his random nature. I even added a third color to support this new guy as well. [c]Mizzix of the Izmagnus[/c] is a busted commander, and I will never say you shouldn’t run her. She is the best Izzet commander period. If your in the playgroup that is as cutthroat as can be, run her. You will have a great time. For me though, I’ll move onto something a bit more fun, like a certain 7/7 for four mana that attacks random people each turn. I’m talking about that rage filled giant, [c]Ruhan of the Fomori[/c].

stf148_ruhan

Sometimes its fun to just attack somebody for no reason other that being there. At lease Ruhan thinks so.

[d title= “Ruhan of the Fomori (EDH)’]
Commander
1 Ruhan of the Fomori

Lands
1 Adarkar Wastes
1 Azorius Chancery
1 Azorius Guildgate
1 Battlefield Forge
1 Blighted Cataract
1 Boros Guildgate
1 Cascade Bluffs
1 Clifftop Retreat
1 Command Tower
1 Desolate Lighthouse
1 Evolving Wilds
1 Glacial Fortress
1 Halimar Depths
1 Hallowed Fountain
4 Island
1 Izzet Boilerworks
1 Izzet Guildgate
1 Minamo, School at Water’s Edge
3 Mountain
1 Mystic Gate
1 Mystic Monastery
3 Plains
1 Reliquary Tower
1 Sacred Foundry
1 Shinka, the Bloodsoaked Keep
1 Shivan Reef
1 Steam Vents
1 Sulfur Falls
1 Swiftwater Cliffs
1 Terramorphic Expanse[/d]

[d]
Creature
1 Jace, Vryn’s Prodigy

Instants
1 Afterlife
1 Azorius Charm
1 Blue Sun’s Zenith
1 Brainstorm
1 Brutal Expulsion
1 Capsize
1 Chaos Warp
1 Comeuppance
1 Counterflux
1 Counterspell
1 Crib Swap
1 Cyclonic Rift
1 Dig Through Time
1 Dismiss
1 Fact or Fiction
1 Izzet Charm
1 Lightning Bolt
1 Muddle the Mixture
1 Mystic Confluence
1 Mystical Tutor
1 Path to Exile
1 Prophetic Bolt
1 Sphinx’s Revelation
1 Swords to Plowshares
1 Turn//Burn
1 Wear//Tear[/d]

[d]
Sorceries
1 Call the Gatewatch
1 Exquisite Firecraft
1 Faithless Looting
1 Gitaxian Probe
1 Merchant Scroll
1 Mizzium Mortars
1 Ponder
1 Preordain
1 Roast
1 Supreme Verdict
1 Treasure Cruise
1 Volcanic Visions
1 Wrath of God

Enchantments
1 Myth Realized
1 Steel of the Godhead[/d]

[d]
Artifacts
1 Azorius Signet
1 Boros Signet
1 Coalition Relic
1 Darksteel Ingot
1 Gilded Lotus
1 Izzet Signet
1 Lightning Greaves
1 Scroll Rack
1 Sensei’s Divining Top
1 Sol Ring
1 Sphinx-Bone Wand
1 Thought Vessel

Planeswalkers
1 Ajani VEngeant
1 Chandra, Flamecaller
1 Dack Fayden
1 Jace, Unraveler of Secrets
1 Narset Transcendent
1 Tamiyo, the Moon Sage
1 Ugin, the Spirit Dragon
1 Venser, the Sojurner[/d]

Ever since I changed my deck, things have been going much better. People actually enjoy playing against me. I may be a bit less powerful, but at least I’m actually able to play with people now. [c]Ruhan of the Fomori[/c] has been especially good in my playgroup. He will end games, but in a fun, exciting way. It may be random, but that commander damage will matter. The super friends sub-theme has also been great. Each planeswalker serves their own purpose, and each fill their respective rolls perfectly. The deck is not overpowering, but its powerful enough to be effective. Most importantly, its just damn good fun for a control mage like me.

The biggest thing to take away from all of this, is to understand your playgroup’s power level. You don’t need to play the most powerful, busted cards of all time to make something work well enough, and you don’t need to win every game. You don’t need to be able to answer everything all the time. What matters most is that everybody is having a good time. Talk to your playgroup about your card selections and what power level you collectively will be around. If you end up overpowering them to the point of them not being able to compete anymore, you’ll just have nobody to play with anymore. Put down the [c]Force of Will[/c]s and pick up [c]Dismiss[/c] instead.

As always, thanks for sticking it out this far, I know it was a bit of a long one this time around. I’ll only be able to write biweekly, mostly because I have a full time job now. So just keep checking back for new spicy brews, cause I have some great ones coming down the pipeline. Ill see you soon my friends.

– Steven Gulsby

Commander Corner: Shu Yun, the Silent Tempest

Welcome back,

Instead of looking at regular Commander, I’ve decided to look at the newly emerging format that is Tiny Leaders. Tiny Leaders is a spin-off of the Commander format. It generally follows the same rules as its larger brethren in terms of its basic structure, but that’s where the similarities end.

Instead of a hundred card deck, each player only has fifty cards. Players also start at twenty five life instead of forty, and get access to a ten card sideboard. The largest difference, though, is that every card in each player’s deck must have a converted mana cost of three or less.

This massive restriction makes this format more akin to Legacy than anything, as many of the decks are full of Legacy staples. With that in mind I decided to essentially build a Standard deck. While that may sound like a bad idea, the deck in question is still quite powerful. As the only Minimander in Jeskai, let’s take a look at what [c]Shu Yun[/c] can do for us.

shu-yun

He can end an opponents life in an instant without uttering a single word

[d title= “Shu Yun’s Warriors (Tiny Leaders)]

Commander

1 Shu Yun, the Silent Tempest

Lands

1 Adarkar Wastes

1 Celestial Colonnade

1 City of Brass

1 Clifftop Retreat

1 Evolving Wilds

1 Flooded Strand

1 Glacial Fortress

1 Hallowed Fountain

1 Mountain

1 Mystic Monastery

1 Plains

1 Sacred Foundry

1 Steam Vents

1 Sulfur Falls

1 Terramorphic Expanse[/d]

[d]

Creatures

1 Akroan Skyguard

1 Battlefield Thaumaturge

1 Battlewise Hoplite

1 Fabled Hero

1 Favored Hoplite

1 Grim Lavamancer

1 Lagonna-Band Trailblazer

1 Phalanx Leader

1 Sage of Hours

1 Satyr Hoplite

1 Tethmos High Priest

1 Wingsteed Rider[/d]

[d]

Instants

1 Aerial Formation

1 Ajani’s Presence

1 Aurelia’s Fury

1 Boros Charm

1 Crypsis

1 Defiant Strike

1 Emerge Unscathed

1 Hope and Glory

1 Lightning Bolt

1 Path to Exile

1 Prismatic Boon

1 Reality Shift

1 Refocus

1 Swords to Plowshares

1 Titan’s Strength

1 Triton Tactics

Sorceries

1 Distortion Strike

1 Launch the Fleet

Enchantments

1 Jeskai Ascendancy

1 Unquestioned Authority[/d]

[d]

Sideboard

1 Condemn

1 Council’s Judgment

1 Electrickery

1 Gods Willing

1 Kor Firewalker

1 Mizzium Mortars

1 Rest in Peace

1 Shattering Spree

1 Spellskite

1 Wear // Tear[/d]

This deck is designed to make combat a nightmare for your opponent. As long as you have mana up, your opponent should be wary. You might just have a trick up your sleeve that potentially will be a blow out for them. Most of the time, actually, you will. And even if you don’t, that fear will still be in your opponent’s mind.

The heroic mechanic is really powerful in this format. Anything that can beat a [c]Tarmogoyf[/c] in combat is a force to be reckoned with. These cheap combat tricks and heroic creatures will go a long way to ensure that your opponent dies quickly. If not, [c]Shu Yun[/c] will step in and get the job done.

[c]Shu Yun[/c] is a commander that doesn’t mess around. If he is left unanswered for a couple turns he will kill your opponent himself, guaranteed.

Being able to turn any combat trick or pump effect into a boatload of damage via his ability is powerful. It turns any non-creature spell you have into a threat on its own. Those bolts and paths will clear the way for your double-striking monsters. Even if [c]Shu Yun[/c] is the only creature on the board, it’s still possible to kill your opponent as long as you clear the path for him. He also makes a good blocker, as he will beat most creatures in combat if you get to use his ability.

I’ve been looking for a shell to put [c]Battlefield Thaumaturge[/c] in, and I think I finally found it. He works very well in this strategy as he frees up your mana a little and combos with some cards that can win you the game. Being able to ping your opponents entire team with [c]Aurelia’s Fury[/c] for two mana will most likely end the game right then and there. [c]Prismatic Boon[/c] will have the same effect, as it also helps you shove your creatures through. It also plays defensively which is nice. [c]Launch the Fleet[/c] might not end the game, but it will be difficult for your opponents to overcome, especially if you have an active [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c].

The largest problem I’ve had with this deck is if your opponent is playing [c]Pernicious Deed[/c]. It’s this deck’s worst enemy. There aren’t many ways to prevent this card from taking out your team at instant speed outside of [c]Boros Charm[/c]. If the deed goes off and you don’t have your charm, you’re pretty much going to lose. If you know your opponent is playing Deed then I would suggest racing them before they can draw it and get it into play. Outside of that, though, you shouldn’t have to worry about much. One-for-one removal can easily be dealt with using the handful of protection spells we are packing.

This deck is about messing with your opponents’ minds. It helps to have a good poker face while playing with this deck since being able to bluff that you have something in your hand (or the other way around) is important. You have to keep them second-guessing themselves. The more they do this, the higher the chance that they will play right into your hands. Being able to mess with your opponent just by leaving mana up is entertaining, as they won’t know whether sending in their best creature might result in a loss. Over time your creatures will overpower anything that will come your way. Just make it seem like you have nothing, and wait for them to send their team in. Then watch their face as their attack backfires in spectacular fashion. Trust me, it’s a good feeling.

Thank you for checking out this week’s Commander Corner. Like always, if you have any suggestions for Commanders for me to check out, let me know in the comments below. Next week, we look to the underground of the High City to meet the man who pulls the strings from below. See you soon, my friends.

-Steven Gulsby

Ascending Into Modern

Last week I reviewed my Ad Nauseam deck and detailed why I think it will be good post-bannings. I still feel true to my word. The bannings for January 19th have finally been revealed and I have to say that I’m very happy with the decisions. Formats now can be renewed and a new beginning has come, and one such deck was possibly given the chance to still rise in the ranks of Modern’s glorious gauntlet. [c]Jeskai Ascendancy[/c] can still shine and, seeing [c]Birthing Pod[/c] has kicked the bucket, Jeskai Control can now return from the brink.

With [c]Treasure Cruise[/c] and [c]Dig Through Time[/c]now banned, the deck becomes a lot slower. So is playing things like Thought Scour and Izzet Charm still worth it? Possibly, but probably not as much now. [c]Fatesticher[/c] and [c]Faerie Conclaves[/c] are still our main nightmare fuel to get the combo going. However, [c]Wind Zendikon[/c] has seen some play in the Legacy version and now with some space to fill up, why not try it in Modern?

Here is a rough draft of a list I’ve come up with. This hasn’t been tested yet, but I will try it out in the near future.

[d title=”Next Level Ascendancy”]
Creatures
4 Fatesticher

Spells
4 Jeskai Ascendancy
4 Serum Visions
4 Gitaxian Probe
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Remand
2 Path to Exile
3 Thought Scour
3 Izzet Charm
2 Peek
2 Telling Time
2 Wind Zendikon
1 Gut Shot

Lands
3 Faerie Conclave
3 Flooded Strand
2 Hallowed Fountain
2 Island
1 Mountain
1 Plains
1 Sacred Foundry
3 Scalding Tarn
1 Seachrome Coast
3 Steam Vents
1 Celestial Colonnade
Sideboard
4 Deceiver Exarch
3 Pestermite
4 Splinter Twin
2 Swan Song
1 Gigadrowse
1 Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker [/d]

Not having tested this version of the deck yet, I feel like it isn’t in its prime but it’s a start.

[c]Peek[/c] lets us draw additional cards at instant speed without paying life and gives us a leg on what the opponent is up to. It also allows us to keep up [c]Path to Exile[/c] and [c]Lightning Bolt[/c] on turn one so we can be more reactive to our opponents.

[c]Remand[/c] is still good to stop our opponent from developing his board state, but [c]Telling Time[/c] lets us dig further at instant speed to insure we can get our combo pieces on time in case the opponent is playing anything we don’t need to worry about.

[c]Wind Zendikon[/c] insures we have some other way to combo off – a backup plan. It still triggers Ascendancy while comboing off so its possibly we may want more. The same goes for [c]Celestial Colonnade[/c] in that it acts as a slow win condition but also serves to let us combo off. It’s very mana intensive, but its there and should be respected in how it can push our late game clock.

[c]Gut Shot[/c] also gives us a way to let us trigger our Jeskai Ascendancy faster and gives us more mana with things like [c]Gitaxian Probe[/c], though I’m compelled to play things like [c]Lightning Helix[/c] over it. The lifegain is really nice, but [c]Gut Shot[/c] lets us kill mana dorks like [c]Birds of Paradise[/c] and even problem cards like [c]Young Pyromancer[/c].

The sideboard is transformational and this is an option that I feel more geared towards. Some like the straight [c]Young Pyromancer[/c] package but with the bannings he doesn’t seem to be as good, though he remains a win condition nonetheless. [c]Monastery Mentor[/c] is a possible inclusion with or replacement for the young wizard, but it’s probably too slow. Sure, it can make bigger dudes later in the game, but it just dies to all sorts of removal that we can’t answer effectively.

We have a [c]Gifts Ungiven[/c] package to get [c]Iona, Shield of Emeria[/c] or [c]Elesh Norn, Grand Cenobite[/c] alongside [c]Unburial Rites[/c] to lock our opponents out of the game, but it feels like it is a sideboard option used too often and people will honestly plan for.

[c]Silence[/c] feels like it can be a good sideboard inclusion to grant us a way around control decks, but that’s what the [c]Gigadrowse[/c] is also there for. It’s difficult for our opponent to counter and play around us if we can manage to tap down all their lands. A trick to remember is when you cast Gigadrowse and replicate it, if you opponent is impatient with a [c]Counterflux[/c] they can counter the gigadrowse, even with overload. However, they have to wait for the Replicate triggers to resolve. So make sure when you cast Gigadrowse and see a following overloaded Counterflux, just smile and say, “Sure, my Gigadrowse is countered. My replicate trigger resolves?” Its a bit like Cascade – just don’t be impatient. It is silly to point out, but cute all the same.

Another sideboard option we can think about having is [c]Geist of Saint Traft[/c], especially since Jeskai Control will most likely be on the rise due to the new bannings. Sure, the list loses [c]Dig Through Time[/c] itself, but with [c]Birthing Pod[/c] now leaving the format, there isn’t much stopping it. Pod was its worst matchup and Jeskai Control can more than likely dominate the metagame. Geist lets us dodge control’s removal while still having burn and dig spells for the late game. If they have an answer for Geist, it might already be too late for them.

The transformational sideboard into [c]Splinter Twin[/c] allows us to kill the opponent when they least expect it. If they tap out turn three without us having a [c]Fatesticher[/c] in the yard or Jeskai Ascendancy in play, they might be thrown off balance when we just slam [c]Deceiver Exarch[/c] or a [c]Pestermite[/c] and show them the [c]Splinter Twin[/c] for the game. It’s something I want to test out to hopefully allow us to trick the opponent, and who doesn’t like that?!

If that sideboard option doesn’t really tickle you, then it’s possible you want something more stable and diverse like this.

[d title”Next Level Ascendancy Sideboard v2″]
Sideboard
4 Young Pyromancer
2 Wear // Tear
2 Torpor Orb
2 Geist of Saint Traft
1 Path to Exile
2 Hurkyl’s Recall
2 Vendilion Clique[/d]

This version is a bit transformational as well but still lets you grind out games instead of comboing off against tough matches. Young Pyromancer still works great with Jeskai Ascendancy and Geist of Saint Traft as noted lets us pressure our opponents. Hurkyl’s Recall is added because I’m pretty confident that Affinity will come back and it’s better to be safe than sorry. Vendilion Clique is good in the mirror and combo matches while applying pressure.

I’m not gonna lie – This feels like a weaker Jeskai Control and slower than Scapeshift. Though it never hurts to sit down and test a deck. Honestly, Modern is all about getting good with a deck you feel comfortable with. Most decks you just can’t pick up and instantly pilot. Many Modern decks take time and some dedication to truly know the ins and outs of a deck, and this deck might be just one of those. I use to play a ton of Jeskai Control when it was extremely popular, but I got bored of it so quickly because that’s just how I felt about control. I haven’t touched a control deck in some time and this is my first take on it. While Ad Nauseam sat in my backpack I was playing Jeskai Combo before the bannings and now I still want to give it a chance before I tuck it away and go back to drawing my entire deck the old fashion way (much quicker and more painful).

UR Storm might even be better than this list and I would have to say it is – afterall it was the first Modern deck I built and competitively played. This Jeskai Combo deck feels as if it’s going to be more difficult to pilot, seeing as you can’t just willy-nilly play the cards in your hand while discarding to Jeskai Ascendancy. It will take some time learning the deck but overall I’m comfortable in testing it out and hopefully making it work in the new Modern metagame. With UR Delver being pushed out of the format and Pod now getting the banhammer, it might be time for a new deck to completely shine and this might be the one. Not this list in particular, but possibly something along these lines. I believe the manadork version is now completely dead and shouldn’t even be looked upon (and it wasn’t honestly all that good in the first place).

Would you guys like to see some live footage of the deck if possible, or see me play it online as video coverage? If so let me know and I will try to make it happen!

~Totem